Biosingularity

Military-grade gel-based liquid bandages: new frontline wound treatment

Posted on: February 10, 2008

The GelSpray Liquid Bandage is a major advance in the management and care of combat casualty and civilian wounds. Much like epoxy is dispensed in household kits, the dressing is applied with a dual syringe that releases two polymer ingredients. These polymers react rapidly upon mixing to form a gel-based dressing that frontline combat soldiers can apply to their own wounds. The dressing conforms to the wound geometry, adheres to intact skin but not directly to the injured tissue, and resists abrasion.n.2-8-08-spray-bandages-cr.jpg 

The Center for Military Biomaterials Research (CeMBR), part of the New Jersey Center for Biomaterials at Rutgers University, has enabled the development of a breakthrough spray-on dressing for injuries. The trademarked GelSpray Liquid Bandage by BioCure Inc., a medical device company in Norcross, Ga., received clearance for marketing from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Feb. 1.

While created for the military, the GelSpray technology has potential uses in civilian health care. Future versions of the liquid bandage may be suitable for use by civilian rescue teams to treat traumatic wounds and burns, as well as in the treatment of diabetic ulcers, ostomies and post-op wounds. Future products based on the GelSpray technology platform will include active ingredients to treat infection and pain, and control severe bleeding.

Rutgers’ Center for Military Biomaterials Research was created to link academia, industry and the military to fulfill urgent military medical care needs. Its mission is to familiarize the biomedical research community with the unique needs of combat casualty care and to foster the development of innovative medical technologies to treat injured soldiers. The center is supported with funding from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) and its Telemedicine and Advanced Technologies Research Center at Fort Detrick, Md.

“In this case, it was the mission of our center to collaborate with industry to conduct research that resulted in a new product,” said Joachim Kohn, the principal investigator at CeMBR and Board of Governors Professor of Chemistry at Rutgers.

In the collaboration with BioCure, the Rutgers center supported the research part of the product development effort with funding from the USAMRMC. Kohn explained that the close collaboration among BioCure, the U.S. Army and Rutgers moved the project rapidly from concept to FDA market clearance. “The process took about three and a half years – a truly remarkable achievement,” Kohn added.

The GelSpray Liquid Bandage was designed in consultation with the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research, part of the USAMRMC, while the Rutgers center provided technical guidance based on knowledge of military product specification requirements, regulatory issues and polymer chemistry..Source: Rutgers University 

About these ads

7 Responses to "Military-grade gel-based liquid bandages: new frontline wound treatment"

Sounds like a huge advancement in healthcare treatment. I thought I’d heard about a product that was developed a few years back that did something similar and that stopped bleeding upon contact. Is this the same product?

Great stuff! I wonder if I can get some for my kitchen, in case I injure myself while cooking. :)

[...] February 11, 2008 Another cool blog I just stumbled across. This is about healthcare advances. The article that caught my eye is about this liquid bandage material. Truly fascinating. We’re soaring into the future—the future is now.Military-grade gel-based bandages  [...]

I’ve seen liquid bandaides in the stores for months now!!

[...] more interesting an immediate advance is polymor based gel bandages. Using a common household side by side epoxy syringe, two different compounds are mixed as they are [...]

What a creative idea? Nicely done. I hope there are minimal side effects on humans. Did they ever tested it?

Great Blog. War has always been at the forefront of so many medical advancements.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 936 other followers

Follow me on Twitter

Medical Professional Database Award

 Doctor

Visitors Now

who's online

Blog Stats

  • 1,406,759 hits

Categories

Top Rated

Flickr Photos

As The Crow Flies

Mechelen, Grote Markt

Baby it's cold Outside

Memorial Floral Tribute For Slain Soldier .... Cpl. Nathan Cirillo .... Hamilton, Ontario

Storm Warning - EXPLORED

galaxy

Rowing Through Autumn

Moorland

Pumpkins

End of the Day

More Photos

Maps

Networked blogs

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 936 other followers

%d bloggers like this: