Biosingularity

Purple sweet potato means increased amount of anti-cancer components

Posted on: June 30, 2009

A Kansas State University researcher is studying the potential health benefits of a specially bred purple sweet potato because its dominant purple color results in an increased amount of anti-cancer components.

K-State’s Soyoung Lim, doctoral student in human nutrition, Manhattan, is working with George Wang, associate professor of human nutrition at K-State, to understand the pigment effects of a Kansas-bred purple sweet potato on cancer prevention.

 A Kansas State University researcher is studying the potential health benefits of a specially bred purple sweet potato because its dominant purple color results in an increased amount of anti-cancer components.  Credit: Kansas State University media relations

A Kansas State University researcher is studying the potential health benefits of a specially bred purple sweet potato because its dominant purple color results in an increased amount of anti-cancer components. Credit: Kansas State University media relations

Lim said purple sweet potatoes have high contents of anthocyanin, which is a pigment that presents the purple color in the vegetable. The pigment can produce red, blue and purple colors depending on the source’s chemical structure, such as in foods like blueberries, red grapes and red cabbage.

She said anthocyanins have been epidemiologically associated with a reduced cancer risk, but the anti-cancer ability of the purple sweet potato has not been well investigated.

Lim used a sweet potato with pronounced purple flesh and skin that was developed by K-State’s Ted Carey, professor of horticulture, at K-State’s John C. Pair Horticultural Center in Haysville.

“Sometimes we can find purple sweet potatoes in the grocery store, but they don’t have this purple color on the skin and inside,” Lim said.

Three different purple sweet potatoes were used that had varying amounts of anthocyanin for the project. To quantify the amount in each potato, Lim extracted pigments from the vegetables and injected them into an HPLC-MS Analysis, which she said is a method that separates components.

The potatoes were segregated by multiple traits based on flesh pigmentation and fiber contents. The analysis determined that the Kansas-bred potato had significantly higher anthocyanin contents compared to the other potatoes. The analysis also found two derivatives of anthocyanin that were dominant: cyanidin and peonidin, Lim said.

Lim also measured the potatoes’ total phenolic content. Lim said phenols are chemical compounds that have been found to have anti-aging and antioxidant components. The specially bred purple sweet potato had a much higher total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity than the other regularly occurring purple sweet potatoes, she said.

The K-State researchers also wanted to see the specific effects of cyanidin and peonidin. Lim treated human colon cancer cells with low concentrations of the pigment derivatives and also studied the effects on the cell cycles.

Cyanidin and peonidin showed significant cell growth inhibition for the cancer cells, but there were no significant changes in the cell cycle. Lim said a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms in the Kansas-bred potato could provide scientific evidence of its health benefits.

About these ads

6 Responses to "Purple sweet potato means increased amount of anti-cancer components"

I tried purple yam today for the first time and it was delicious. I am curious about other ethnic foods so I am constantly trying them I know the purple yam is one that I will continue to buy.

I also like the Korean yam as well andbuy them all the time, both are soo sweet and good, I bake several and keep in the freezer until I want one .

where did you buy it. I have looked at several super markets and none sell it.

You will usually find these yams in Asian stores, and some health food stores such as Sprouts, and Whole Foods (although they cost higher than Asian stores).

I also tried a purple yam today and agree that it is delicious. In San Francisco, it is sold in the local Farmer’s market. I have not seen them in the larger gorcery stores yet.

I have tried the sweet purple potatoe twice already and it is very delicious. Just bake in oven for one hour. Then cut as you would any potatoe and eat with butter. I found them at a market in Scarsdale, New York called the Fresh Market. Its a high end specialty gourmet store. They have almost everything you can think of of fresh fruits and vegetables. Nina

My wife and I grew up (Philippines) snacking on boiled purple yam, no butter. Yummmy. We use microwave now.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 937 other followers

Follow me on Twitter

Medical Professional Database Award

 Doctor

Visitors Now

who's online

Blog Stats

  • 1,410,053 hits

Categories

Top Rated

Flickr Photos

Late November II (Explored)

Darley Mist

Stack'em High

Autumn Oak Reflections in Copper & Blue ©

Tonlé Sap - man on boat

Last of the Day

how heavenly heaven can be with you

Border Collie 101 - Introduction to Sheep

Pigs Can Fly!

Half moon over Brightlingsea

More Photos

Maps

Networked blogs

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 937 other followers

%d bloggers like this: