Biosingularity

Researchers use fluorescent nanotubes to study inner workings of lab mice

Posted on: July 14, 2011

Developing drugs to combat or cure human disease often involves a phase of testing with mice, so being able to peer clearly into a living mouse’s innards has real value.

But with the fluorescent dyes currently used to image the interior of laboratory mice, the view becomes murky a few millimeters under the skin.

Now Stanford researchers have developed an improved imaging method using fluorescent carbon nanotubes that create color images centimeters beneath the skin with far more clarity than conventional dyes provide. For a creature the size of a mouse, a few centimeters makes a great difference.

via Stanford researchers use fluorescent nanotubes to study inner workings of lab mice.

1 Response to "Researchers use fluorescent nanotubes to study inner workings of lab mice"

[…] Researchers use fluorescent nanotubes to study inner workings of lab mice (via Biosingularity) Posted on July 14, 2011 by Lee Robinson Petzer Developing drugs to combat or cure human disease often involves a phase of testing with mice, so being able to peer clearly into a living mouse's innards has real value. But with the fluorescent dyes currently used to image the interior of laboratory mice, the view becomes murky a few millimeters under the skin. Now Stanford researchers have developed an improved imaging method using fluorescent carbon nanotubes that create color images centimete … Read More […]

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